career-advice

Should you include a professional summary on your resume?

Matt Glodz
Should you include a professional summary on your resume?

4 reasons we don’t recommend a professional summary (and what to do instead)

When crafting your resume, you have an extremely limited amount of space to work with.

As such, you should be especially mindful of whether every word and every bullet point truly adds value.

In most cases, the professional summary is not.

We recommend deleting your professional summary for the following four reasons:

1) Your resume is already a short document: you don’t need a summary to summarize it

At most, your resume is two to three pages long. At best, it’s only a page.

If you’re effectively incorporating skim value into your document, a recruiter should be able to skim it in under 30 seconds and still pick up the key information they’re looking for such as:

  • skills
  • position titles
  • company names
  • locations
  • main accomplishments
  • education

2) Professional summaries tend to be generic and full of empty buzzwords

The typical professional summary boasts numerous cliches regarding how the candidate has “ten years of proven sales and digital marketing experience,” is a “strong team leader,” and has “effective verbal and written communication skills,” for example.

If you do, that’s great!

However, always aim to show recruiters examples of these characteristics instead of simply telling them.

3) Your work experience section allows you to convey your skills in a more believable manner

Professional summaries that incorporate generic buzzwords don’t sound believable without any concrete evidence to back up the statements.

These types of statements also make you sound like similar candidates who are applying for the same position.

Aim to differentiate yourself from your competition.

You’ll be able to do so in a much more compelling manner by providing real-world examples in the context of your work experience.

4) It’s best to simply stick to the facts and let your experience speak for itself

If you are a good candidate for the position, you don’t need to use flowery language to effectively convince a recruiter that you will be able to excel in the role you’re applying for.

Sometimes, the harder you try, the more obvious it is – causing you to unintentionally lose credibility instead of building it up.

Why a career highlights section is a stronger alternative

Instead a writing a professional summary in paragraph format, we recommend including a Career Highlights section, which consists of 4-5 bullet points that:

  • Outline key achievements from your career
  • Demonstrate how your experience aligns with the target role

In these bullet points, avoid generic descriptions describing your skills sets.

Instead, mention company names and provider concrete examples of projects you completed and your achievements.

Experienced Executives

If you are an experienced executive, use the career highlights section to provide an overview of your career progression.

What were your biggest contributions?

What aspects of your career are you most proud of?

Career Switchers and Job Hoppers

If you held unrelated positions across multiple industries or have a non-linear career path, you can leverage the career highlights section to tie your diverse experiences together around a common theme.

In this case, it’s best to approach this section by keeping the jobs you are applying for in mind.

What aspects of your unique experience are most applicable to the roles you’re now pursuing?

Academics and Researchers

Academic and research CVs tend to be significantly longer than a professional resume.

In these cases, your highlights section will serve as an executive summary – or elevator pitch – outlining your career trajectory.

For academic CVs, a traditional professional summary written in paragraph format can also be appropriate.

However, it should still avoid any generic and unsubstantiated statements.

In Summary

Just as with many other aspects of resume writing, whether you should include a professional summary is best determined on a case-by-case basis.

In most cases, the answer is "no."

The most important question to keep in mind is whether your summary is truly adding value.

If you’re simply repeating information found elsewhere on your resume or your content sounds generic, it’s best to leave it off.


About Resume Pilots

Resume Pilots is an award-winning executive resume writing firm and a proud member of the Professional Association of Resume Writers and Career Coaches. Our previous clients include CEOs and senior executives at the world's leading companies.

As a professional services firm, we take your reputation seriously. We are committed to delivering writing excellence and superior service while operating with integrity and discretion. Recruitment firms we partner with also trust us to consistently deliver quality documents for their clients.

Our writers have studied in the Ivy League and other top-tier universities and have strong writing backgrounds coupled with industry experience.

Here's how we can help you:

Resume, Cover Letter, and LinkedIn Writing Services: If you are looking for end-to-end support, hire one of our professional resume writers to rewrite your documents from the ground up.

Executive Resume Template Downloads: If you plan to prepare your own resume, consider using one of our classic, ATS-friendly resume templates for Microsoft Word.

To learn more about our services, book an introductory call with our founder here or email team@resumepilots.com.


About the AuthorMatt Glodz


Matt Glodz is the Founder and Managing Partner of Resume Pilots and a Certified Professional Resume Writer.

After studying business communication at Cornell University, Matt worked within Fortune 500 companies, where he noted that qualified candidates were frequently denied interview opportunities due to poorly written documents.

At Resume Pilots, Matt combines his business and writing background - which includes prior work for a Chicago Tribune publication - to craft resumes that give his clients the best chance of landing interviews. He works with clients ranging from CEOs to recent graduates and has been writing resumes for over 10 years.

He has been quoted on numerous business and career-related topics in outlets including Business Insider, CNBC, Fortune, Glassdoor, The Ladders, and Thrive Global.


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